Fast Forward: How Women Can Achieve Power and Purpose


Fast Forward, by two women leaders with experience and access throughout corporate America and around the world, takes the next step. Through interviews with a network of over fifty trailblazing women, it shows women how to accelerate their growing economic power and combine it with purpose to create success and meaning in their lives while building a better world.

"Fast Forward shows us how leaders at every level can use their power and purpose to help more and more women achieve their dreams for a better life." - Hillary Rodham Clinton



From the author of The Personal History of Rachel Dupree, shortlisted for the Orange Award for New Writers and long listed for the Orange Prize.

1900. Young pianist Catherine Wainwright flees the fashionable town of Dayton, Ohio in the wake of a terrible scandal. Heartbroken and facing destitution, she finds herself striking up correspondence with a childhood admirer, the recently widowed Oscar Williams. In desperation she agrees to marry him, but when Catherine travels to Oscar's farm on Galveston Island, Texas—a thousand miles from home—she finds she is little prepared for the life that awaits her. The island is remote, the weather sweltering, and Oscar's little boy Andre is grieving hard for his lost mother. And though Oscar tries to please his new wife, the secrets of the past sit uncomfortably between them.



In 1960, Billie Valentine is a young housewife living in a sleepy Massachusetts suburb, treading water in a dull marriage and caring for two adopted daughters. Summers spent with the girls at their lakeside camp in Vermont are her one escape - from her husband's demands, from days consumed by household drudgery, and from the nagging suspicion that life was supposed to hold something different. In this deeply tender novel, T. Greenwood weaves deftly between the past and present to create a poignant and wonderfully moving story of friendship, the resonance of memories, and the love that keeps us afloat.

Zelda Fitzgerald: The Tragic, Meticulously Researched Biography of the Jazz Age's High Priestess


Zelda Fitzgerald was the mythical American Dream Girl of the Roaring Twenties who became, in the words of her husband, F. Scott Fitzgerald, "the first American flapper." Their romance transformed a symbol of glamour and spectacle of the Jazz Age. When Zelda cracked up, not long after the stock market crash of 1929, Scott remained loyal to her through a nightmare of later breakdowns and final madness.

Winners and Losers: Battles, Retreats, Gains, Losses, and Ruins From the Vietnam War



Thirty Years of Treason, Volume 1: Excerpts from Hearings before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, 1938 - 1968

Various narrators

The testimony that the author has gleaned for this book from the 30-year record of the House Un-American Activities Committee focuses on HUAC's treatment of artists, intellectuals, and performers. This highly listenable and absorbing collection of significant excerpts from the hearings shows with painful clarity how HUAC grew from a panel that investigated possible subversive activities in a "dignified" manner to a huge, unrelenting accusatory finger from which almost no one was safe.


Audio Sample Coming Soon

Coleen Marlo narrates this intelligent personal growth book with the directness we associate with the author, the hard-driving founder of the online newspaper The Huffington Post. Marlo's performance asserts and reinforces Huffington's powerful insights with reassuring confidence. This satisfying blend of personal sharing and wisdom feels precious and ancient. Instead of burning out striving for power or financial success, the three legs of her Third Metric (well-being, wisdom, wonder) direct us to get off our treadmill, quiet the mind and body, and learn the joy of service to others. Coming from such a prodigious achiever and read with such appealing authority, these are truths that overstretched listeners will savor and want to bring into their lives. T.W. © AudioFile 2014

Arianna Huffington's personal wakeup call came in the form of a broken cheekbone and a nasty gash over her eye - the result of a fall brought on by exhaustion and lack of sleep. The co-founder and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post, one of the fastest growing media companies in the world, celebrated as one of the world's most influential women, gracing the covers of magazines, she was, by any traditional measure, extraordinarily successful. Yet as she found herself going from brain MRI to CAT scan to echocardiogram, to find out if there was any underlying medical problem beyond exhaustion, she found herself wondering, is this really what success feels like?


Steve Jobs was a remarkable man who wanted to unify the world through technology. For him, the point was to set people free with tools to explore their own unique creativity. Chrisann Brennan knows this better than anyone. She met him in high school, at a time when Jobs was passionately aware that there was something much bigger to be had out of life, and that new kinds of revelations were within reach.

The Bite in the Apple is the very human tale of Jobs's ascent and the toll it took, told from the author's unique perspective as his first girlfriend, co-parent, friend, and—like many others—object of his cruelty. Brennan writes with depth and breadth, and she doesn't buy into all the hype. She talks with passion about an idealistic young man who was driven to change the world, about a young father who denied his own child, and about a man who mistook power for love.

On the Noodle Road


Jen Lin-Liu takes a journey that follows the origins of pasta, traveling and eating a path through western China, Central Asia, Iran, Turkey, and across the Mediterranean to Italy. Narrator Coleen Marlo captures the author's diverse roots with crisp American accents and perfectly uttered Chinese phrases. She deftly shifts from travelogue to personal musings to vivid, mouthwatering ingredient descriptions, often with audible longing. Lin-Liu set herself to discover how ancient culinary migrations led to the development of pasta cookery in diverse cultures. She learned the skills of blending, shaping, and comparing noodles in a variety of cuisines--and shared goals, gender roles, and the search for self among a global sisterhood of women. A.W. © AudioFile 2013
"Delightful. . . . This book is not just for foodies or cooks: any and all will enjoy it." ---Library Journal Starred Review
"A footloose, spontaneous and appetite-whetting journal of culinary adventure." ---Kirkus
"Lin-Liu's journey is a bold palate-awakening adventure, endearingly rendered." ---Publishers Weekly

The Widows of Braxton County


Widows of Braxton County by Jess McConkey is a haunting and suspenseful novel about family secrets and how well we really know the people we love. Kate is looking forward to starting a new life with her new husband, Joseph Krause. She leaves the big city and moves with him to the Iowa farm that has been in his family for more than 140 years. Instead of something out of Country Living, Kate finds life on the farm a struggle. She hears gossip from the unfriendly neighbors about the connection between the Krause family and a mysterious death decades before. As the past creeps into Kate's present, she's caught in a web of dangerous, unexplainable events.